Cannes Contenders: Ogilvy New Zealand

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How will Asia-Pacific perform at Cannes this year? In the lead up to the Festival, Campaign Brief will be showcasing the work we hope will impress the judges…


Auckland Transport: The most dangerous stunt in the world
Ogilvy New Zealand
Aucklanders don’t realise how dangerous distracted driving is. It’s so dangerous, even someone famous for doing dangerous things wouldn’t do it. So AT partnered with Aucklander and Hollywood stuntwoman Zoë Bell.

Using one of the problems as the media, Zoë shocked her fans by sharing a selfie video where she mirrored their dangerous driving habits; using her phone, drinking coffee and applying makeup. The video ends with Zoë revealing that she wasn’t actually driving, but being towed on a trailer, with the message ‘no one is invincible’.

The creative launched on Zoë’s social channels- Instagram, Facebook & Twitter. By using these platforms, fans thought it was a regular post and were alarmed to see Zoë driving distracted. This resulted in genuine shock and anger towards her dangerous driving habits until our ‘no one is invincible’ message was revealed.

The social video was shared beyond Zoë’s fan base, generating conversation about the dangers of distracted driving around the world.


New Zealand Police: Question a Cop
Ogilvy New Zealand
New Zealand Police needed to double its recruitment targets for 2018, with an aim to increase diversity amongst its intake – Especially targeting more Maori and more females.

Many potential recruits had questions about joining the Police that were going unanswered because they didn’t know an officer to ask. Especially those in our minority target, whose conversations with the Police often felt like an interrogation. This breakdown in communication caused many to leave their applications unfinished. We needed to find a way to open up the lines of communication and it had to allow the public to ask police officers anything, and have their questions answered to give them the confidence to sign up.

So, we turned the tables and let the public question the cops.
Our recruitment video was written by sourcing the public’s questions asked on social media. And we used comedians, journalists, police dogs, Te Reo Māori, cops from movies, and our paranormal division to help speak to our target audience. Viewers were encouraged to sign up or continue asking questions at ChatCops.co.nz.

In the week of launch, this reverse questioning continued across TV talk shows, where interviewers’ questions were submitted by the public via social. We also had officers answering questions on talk-back Māori radio programs, as well as setting up pop-up Police Stations, where officers were waiting to be asked questions. In the following weeks, a retargeting campaign ran across Instagram and other social channels, for those who still had questions.

Speaking to a cop has helped many new recruits overcome any personal barriers they had about joining the Police. Six months into our campaign our applications are 30% above our projected targets. And most importantly, applications for Maori and women are up in record numbers. Making this the most successful recruitment campaign New Zealand Police has ever had.

We are inviting agencies to showcase your agency’s best chances at Cannes this year. Open to all Asian based agencies entering Cannes this year. Just email kim@campaignbrief.com with a paragraph or two on each of your best chances at this year’s festival. Include a link to the case study/TVC or supply jpegs if it is print.